LGBTQ+ Program

By-and-for services for LGBTQ survivors of intimate partner/domestic violence and sexual violence

Do you share any of these common fears?

  • Do you feel like you have nowhere to turn for help and fear hostile responses from family, friends, service providers, therapists, or police because of homophobia and anti-LGBTQ+ bias?

  • Are you worried that if you report the violence, you won’t be believed/denied services due to stereotypes about the LGBTQ+ community?

  • Are you worried that you won’t be believed if your attacker is not socially seen as a perpetrator?

  • Are you afraid of being outed if you tell your family, the courts, or report the violence to the police?

  • Do you feel like you’d be betraying the LGBTQ+ community by disclosing that you were assaulted by another LGBTQ+ person?

  • Are you afraid that you would expose your perpetrator to a homophobic criminal justice system if you pursue legal solutions?

 

You’re not alone! We have culturally competent, LGBTQ+ specific survivor programs and services!

DCRC’s LGBTQ+ Program serves LGBTQ+ survivors of intimate partner/domestic violence and sexual violence. Our by-and-for program provides free and confidential services including*:

  • case management, crisis intervention, and safety planning🌈

  • 24 hr crisis line (919-403-6562)

  • emergency shelter

  • individual counseling

  • support groups🌈

  • court accompaniment🌈

  • hospital accompaniment

 

For more information, please call to speak to an advocate from the LGBTQ+ program at 919-403-9425, Ext 271, Monday - Friday 9 AM - 5 PM. After hours, please call our 24-hour help line at 919-403-6562.

*Rainbow after indicates staff from our LGBTQ+ program provide this service directly. Other services are provided by agency staff and volunteers who have gone through LGBTQ+ cultural competency training and who may identify as LGBTQ+.   

(Sources for statistics)

2015 US Transgender Survey 

http://www.transequality.org/sites/default/files/docs/usts/USTS%20Full%20Report%20-%20FINAL%201.6.17.pdf

 

2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/NISVS_Report2010-a.pdf

 

2016 NCAVP Intimate Partner Violence Report

https://avp.org/resources/reports/

How Are Things Feeling?

 

Do(es) my partner(s):

  • Support me and respect my choices?

  • Acknowledge and validate my identity(ies)?

  • Support me spending time with friends or family?

 

Do I:

  • Feel comfortable talking about my feelings, sex, and other important things with my partner(s)?

  • Feel like I can make my own decisions about my finances, schedule, friends, and gender expression?

For Survivors:

Knowing the Signs of Domestic Violence

Does your partner…

  • Threaten to out you - your gender identity, sexual orientation, HIV status or immigration status to friends, family, or at work?

  • Refuse to recognize your name, pronouns, identity, or preferred language?

  • Control your access to medicine (hormones, anti-anxiety/depression, PrEP/PEP, ART, substance replacement therapy, birth control)?

  • Pressure or force you to do something sexual you don’t want to do? Fetishize or exoticize your identity and/or body without your consent?

 

Actions like these can be harmful for your emotional and physical health. Give us a call at 919-403-9425, Ext 271 for support.

Understanding Sexual Violence

  • Sexual violence is any form of forced or coerced sexual activity, including, but not limited to: rape, incest, child sexual abuse, ritual abuse, stranger rape, date/acquaintance rape, partner/marital rape, sexual harassment inside and outside of the workplace, exposure, and voyeurism.

  • Sexual violence includes situations in which a person may be drunk, high, unconscious, or has a disability and cannot consent to sexual activity.

  • Sexual violence also includes coercion beyond agreed upon terms in sex work.

  • Sexual violence may occur on a date, between friends, partners, strangers, or clients.

  • Sexual violence happens to and are committed by people of all sexual orientations and gender identities.

  • Sexual violence is NEVER the fault of the survivor.

For Service Providers:

 

We have free support available to any agencies that want to improve their ability to work with LGBTQ+ survivors.  Staff in our program can provide:

  • training on unique ways that intimate partner violence manifests in LGBTQ+ communities (including review of LGBTQ+ terminology and concepts)

  • consultation on any aspect of an agency’s services (intake paperwork, clinical documentation, outreach and marketing, physical environment, etc) to improve competency in working with LGBTQ+ survivors

  • ongoing technical assistance to maintain LGBTQ+ competent services to survivors

  • outreach at community events

  • detailed information about services offered and referral process

  • workshops at staff retreats, conferences, community collaboratives, etc.

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206 N. Dillard Street, Durham, NC 27701 Office Phone: (919) 403-9425
Office Hours: 9AM - 5PM

© Durham Crisis Response Center 2019